London's Docklands, to 1981. The Docks.
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Drainage channels
Bromley Hall
Kennels
Royal Dockyards, Woolwich
Convoy's Wharf
Whitechapel Bell Foundry
Discovery
Pocahontas


This is a photographic chronology of developments in London's Docklands.

These pages cover the whole of the Thames Gateway (everything east of Tower Bridge) and especially the Isle of Dogs and Canary Wharf areas.
For more in the series, visit these pages:



1200's: Drainage channels built on the Isle of Dogs
Previously marshland.
Drainage channels

Bromley Hall
1485: Bromley Hall, Poplar
A manor house, later used by Henry VIII and now thought to be the oldest brick building in London.

1500's: Kennels on the Isle of Dogs
Kennels built for Henry VIII's hunting dogs which (supposedly) gave the peninsula its name.

[Actual kennels may differ from image shown]
Kennels

Royal Dockyards, Woolwich
1512: Royal Dockyards, Woolwich
By the seventeenth century, the royal dockyards were the largest concentrations of industrial activity in England.
HMS Beagle was built here in 1820.

1513: Royal Dockyards, Deptford
Now the site of Convoy's Wharf.
Convoy's Wharf

Whitechapel Bell Foundry
1570: Whitechapel Bell Foundry
Britain's oldest manufacturing company, and the foundry where Big Ben was made.

1606: Colonists depart for America
Colonists depart from the north bank of the Thames at Blackwall, on their way to setup the first permanent English colony in America - Jamestown, Virginia.
This is a replica of the Discovery - one of the three ships that sailed, moored in West India Dock.
Discovery

Pocahontas
1617: Princess Pocahontas buried in Gravesend
The mythical Pocahontas (as seen in the Disney movie) was actually the first Native American to visit Europe.
This statue dates from 1958, and is a replica of one in Jamestown, Virginia.



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